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5 Facts That Will Cure Your Fear of Flying

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Don’t let fear of flight stop you from seeing the world!

Did you know that flying is 200 times safer than driving a car? Despite that fact, more than two thirds of people experience some kind of anxiety when catching a flight. Yeah, we get it, humans flying around in the sky isn’t exactly natural. However, we’re pretty smart at making some super safe aircraft. Still not convinced? Still have a fear of flying? Here are a few facts that will help you understand and feel safer before your next flight.

By the way, once you have rid yourself of your aerophobia, boss your airport experience with these 16 Airport Hacks That Will Change The Way You Travel Forever. You can get more flying tips from our Airport Tips category.

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1. About Turbulence

It’s like driving over a speed bump…. With a tank! Every modern plane is built to sustain incredibly strong turbulence. In fact, planes are tested against turbulence that don’t even exist. So there is no chances that natural turbulence damage a plane. Hint, the tank…

So just enjoy and check out some ways to stay comfortable during a long-haul flight right here.
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2. About Weather conditions

Every modern plane can handle rain, high wind and even lighting strikes but for more safety, pilots will always fly around or above pockets of bad weather conditions just so the flight is as comfortable as possible.

Are you prepared for the weather when arriving in New Zealand? Get clued up with our What is the Weather Like in New Zealand?
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3. What if Somebody goes nuts and open the door of the plane?

This is one of the most common fears when flying: what if somebody loses it and open the door of the plane? This is simply impossible in flight. Not only because of mechanical security systems but also because of basic physics. During flight, there is over one tonne of pressure around the door that keeps it sealed for good. It’s like parking a car over the door; good luck opening it.

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4. Mechanical issues

People are sometimes scared of mechanical failure in an aircraft, especially when hearing an unusual noise. You know things break… But remember, on average, for each hour of flight a modern plane is subject to 11 hours of maintenance. And as pilots say: the planes are the happiest in the air.

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5. Statistics

There is only one out of 11 million chances that you will ever experience an accident when flying and the survival rate is 98%. This means that you would need to fly once per day for 22,000 years to die in a plane crash. So next time you catch a flight remind yourself that you have 11 million reasons to stay calm and enjoy.

Need more statistics in your life? Check out New Zealand in Numbers
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